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16/01/18

The Tees Rivers Trust

Water run offs in action! signs of soil erosion caused from water running off over a slope, rillls can be clearly seen on the slope with sediment settled out in the second picture. This slope is running down towards Cotham Beck a tributary of Lustrum Beck The farmer has followed best practise by working this slope across the contour, if he hadn't this erosion would have been much worse. The Trust is currently implementing a series of works in the area , to help reduce run offs like this entering Lustrum Beck and its tributaries as part of the FRAMES project. ... See MoreSee Less

Water run offs in action! signs of soil erosion caused from water running off over a slope, rillls can be clearly seen on the slope with sediment settled out in the second picture. This slope is running down towards Cotham  Beck a tributary of Lustrum Beck  The farmer has followed best practise by working this slope across the contour, if he hadnt this erosion would have been much worse. The Trust is currently implementing a series of works in the area , to help reduce run offs like this entering Lustrum Beck and its tributaries as part of the FRAMES project.Image attachment

Rediscovered: River Tees Rediscovered' aerial video of the Tees from Piercebridge to Tees mouth - worth a watch! youtu.be/ERz00-9WCAQ ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Nicely put together. Has anyone done anything comparable from the headwaters through High & Low Force, Middleton, Barnard Castle and so on?

12/01/18

The Tees Rivers Trust

Very satisfying way to start the New Year - topographic survey to scope out a bypass channel around a weir on Scur Beck. The weir is one of 5 that were built in the 1700s as part of the grade 2 listed formal park and is the last one surviving. The channel will circumnavigate the weir and open the upper catchment up to migrating fish. There is another obstacle to overcome under a bridge at Battle Hill which we will look at next year ... See MoreSee Less

Very satisfying way to start the New Year -  topographic survey to scope out a bypass channel around a weir on Scur Beck. The weir is one of 5 that were built in the 1700s as part of the grade 2 listed formal park and is the last one surviving. The channel will circumnavigate the weir and open the upper catchment up to migrating fish. There is another obstacle to overcome under a bridge at Battle Hill which we will look at next yearImage attachment

14/12/17

The Tees Rivers Trust

Thanks very much indeed to Dave, Ian and Tony from Sembcorp Utilities UK Ltd for the guided tour around Dabholme Gut this morning. We are looking at opportunities for monitoring elver in this brilliantly-named waterbody which flows through a fascinating and complex landscape. Smelled fox when we got out of the car, saw otter spraint, over 100 shell ducks and the flash of a kingfisher all in the space of 5 minutes and all in the heart of this industrial miasma. Looks like we have got our work cut out getting eels past this lot and into Coatham Marsh though, but never say never!! ... See MoreSee Less

 

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give the E A a ring they will give you thousands of elvers to stock in your river and stream sections.......they do it all over the country.....to feed the predators that have been re-introduced and of coarse the ones that have come from Europe with feathers and their brother in arms from out at sea,and don't forget them cute little furry things that are decimating rivers and fisheries,oh yes and then the mink,the grebes,and may be not last nor least the American cray that just loves eating caviar ....to sum it up your just providing a larder for predation,show some pictures of the fish that have had their throats ripped out by the otter and see how cute they realy are....would you put your finger in its mouth to see how gentle and cute they look,i very much doubt it,,,print some truthfull accounts for once will you!!!!!

30/11/17

The Tees Rivers Trust

Japanese knotweed biological control field work is still going strong on the Tees. The photos show adult, egg and nymph stages of the Psyllids on-site. Patsy Ryan of The Environment Agency's Biodiversity team was keen to see the Psyllids for herself. ... See MoreSee Less

The view from HQ this afternoon, South Park, Darlington ... See MoreSee Less

The view from HQ this afternoon, South Park, Darlington

 

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Rockwell nature reserve this afternoon

I do miss working in the park. Always such a pretty walk to work.

This info has just come in from Environment Agency.................... As we approach the main spawning season for Salmon and Sea Trout, it is possible that you will see dead and dying large fish. Many of these are reaching the end of their natural life cycle after a long, difficult and amazing migration, and most will have successfully spawned a next generation of salmon and trout. The challenges of migration combined with dropping water temperatures may result in many of the fish developing white blotches on the skin. This is caused by a common waterborne fungus called Saprolegnia, and again represents a natural process. Although this can look unsightly, many fish will still successfully spawn with this condition. ... See MoreSee Less

This info has just come in from Environment Agency.................... As we approach the main spawning season for Salmon and Sea Trout, it is possible that you will see dead and dying large fish. Many of these are reaching the end of their natural life cycle after a long, difficult and amazing migration, and most will have successfully spawned a next generation of salmon and trout. The challenges of migration combined with dropping water temperatures may result in many of the fish developing white blotches on the skin. This is caused by a common waterborne fungus called Saprolegnia, and again represents a natural process. Although this can look unsightly, many fish will still successfully spawn with this condition.

 

Comment on Facebook

Karin Olsson looks like your pic the other day

Gene Brownless

That would be 291 or so that managed to get past the seals at the barrage is it? Tyne had 32K, the Wear nearly 12k